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BeitragVerfasst am: Di Nov 04, 2014 10:53:19 
Titel: Die nuklearen Provokationen Putin's...
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sollte doch den Menschen hier in Europa zu Denken geben…

Zitat:


Moscow’s Nuclear Provocation Goes Unpunished

President Barack Obama’s dream of a “nuclear-free world” comes up against Kremlin reality.

By JOHN VINOCUR

Nov. 3, 2014 2:03 p.m. ET

Russian bombers flew practice runs near NATO territory from the Black and Baltic Seas to the Atlantic Ocean at the coast of Portugal last week. Fighter jets from Alliance members rose to observe and symbolically intercept them.

It was basically old stuff that made new headlines, a 2014 redo of a Noh play-style exercise out of the Cold War’s book of conventions. German Chancellor Angela Merkel , to whom the Obama administration seems to have largely outsourced America’s traditional responsibilities in trying to control the Russians on Ukraine, said, “I am not concerned.”

That’s an all-is-well swerve around a deeper reality: President Vladimir Putin has authorized the basing of elements of nuclear systems—Russian short-range Iskander-M ballistic missiles and TU-22 heavy bombers capable of carrying long-range air-launched cruise missiles—in Crimea, the Ukrainian region he grabbed by force in February and absorbed as a Russian territory.

Here’s an act of brazenness that exemplifies the intensity of the Kremlin’s drive to rewrite the strategic relationships of the post-Soviet world. Its context is scary. Mr. Putin—now having reinforced his hand on Ukraine through control of its eastern provinces—encounters no one ready to impose truly dissuasive costs on him for challenging the integrity of the West.

The tiptoeing is getting old. It’s close to three months since the deployment was authorized without any serious response from Washington or from Ms. Merkel’s government.

But the concern is real. In a Sept. 23 letter to President Barack Obama, Rep. Howard P. McKeon, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, and Rep. Mike Rogers, chairman the House Select Committee on Intelligence, wrote: “It is intolerable that Russia may be able to deploy destabilizing weapons systems such as new ground-launched cruise and ballistic missiles without the Alliance’s knowledge.”

The congressmen called such a basing “a clear and perhaps irrevocable tearing” of the security environment, and complained that “we see no evidence” that NATO is considering countermeasures. If Moscow doesn’t comply with existing treaties, they urged the administration to begin “research and development, and a review of potential deployment sites” for an appropriate nuclear response.

The letter was written following a report in July by the State Department that Russia, in violation of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, had tested a ground-launched cruise missile. The treaty effectively bans nuclear weapons, either cruise or ground-launched ballistic missiles, with a range of 500 to 5,000 kilometers.

Regardless, while Russia’s military doctrine has been updated to call for early use of nukes in regional conflicts, Mr. Putin’s obvious immediate goal is to split NATO, demonstrating its frailty, on an issue many members of the alliance are anxious to avoid: nuclear modernization.

Germany sprints from the subject. In America, the matter is politically charged, considering Mr. Obama’s overzealous attempt to call for a “nuclear-free world” and the strategic risk he’s taken on the use of Berlin as a stand-in for dealing with Russia’s seizures of sovereignty in Ukraine.

What would have caught the Russian president’s eye here? For one thing, there’s Ms. Merkel’s Social Democratic coalition partner, which states in its declaration on government aims that it wants to rid the country of U.S. nukes stored on German soil. And above all, the avoidance by Berlin of any complaint about Russia’s Iskander missiles stationed since last year in its Kaliningrad enclave between Poland and Lithuania.

Technically, those Russian missiles with a range of less than 500 kilometers don’t fall under the INF treaty provisions. Just as technically, it is 527 kilometers by air from Kaliningrad to the Berlin city limits, which makes its eastern suburbs a very iffy real-estate proposition.

Among other NATO countries where U.S. nuclear weapons are deployed in Europe, the Netherlands and Belgium have also stated their desire to be free of them. Jonathan Eyal of the Royal United Services Institute, a security-and-defense think tank in London, described the situation this way: “The grimmest of all decisions facing NATO now is nuclear modernization. It is the subject that meets all Putin’s needs in Russia’s advance as a revisionist power and widening every possible crack in the Alliance.”

Under these circumstances, just suppose that in the next couple of months the Americans, or their nuclear allies, Britain and France, picked up hard evidence from Crimea that Russia was making preliminary preparations for deploying ground-to-ground missiles there.

That just might happen. Would the Obama administration—as guarantor of the U.S.’s signature with Russia’s on the INF treaty and the 1994 Budapest Memorandum providing security assurances for Ukraine—then disclose their discovery?

It’s not necessarily a precedent, but in 2009 the administration for months held intelligence showing that Iran was secretly building a nuclear-enrichment plant because Mr. Obama said he wanted to make sure the information was “right.” Wondering how the White House reacted to the House armed-services and intelligence chiefs’ concern about Mr. Putin’s “brandishing of the nuclear saber”? Their spokesman emailed me last week to say the Congressmen were told: “Thank you for your interest in national security.”

Mr. Vinocur is former executive editor of the International Herald Tribune.


www.wsj.com
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BeitragVerfasst am: Di Nov 04, 2014 14:07:21 
Titel: gut, der gute Golts
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weist zwar auf die grossen Gefahren der Putin'schen nuklearen Verbalerotik hin, meint allerdings, dass der Kreml da technisch einer Fata Morgana aufsitzt..

nur, wurscht, ob alte oder neuere Nukes…in den Händen von Putin & Co sind sie eine reale Gefahr für die ganze Welt…

Zitat:
….Muscovites are staging a campaign against Western sanctions called: "Fighting sanctions with fashion." Participants trade in their old T-shirts with Western slogans for new shirts bearing such inscriptions as: "Sanctions? My Iskander laughs at sanctions," or "The Topol couldn't care less about sanctions" — references to Russia's Iskander and Topol ballistic missiles.

Several major Moscow companies are funding the campaign, including Vnukovo Airport, the Transtroyinvest construction company and the Baikal corporation. It is by no means an individual initiative: The T-shirt giveaway has the direct support of the Public Relations Committee of the Moscow City government.

Here we have ostensibly well-adjusted businesspeople and public servants convincing their fellow citizens that they should take pride in Russia waging an undeclared war on a neighboring country and annexing part of its territory — and knowing that nobody can stop Russia because it has the ability to destroy all life on this planet.

Of course, the U.S. has the same capability, but everyone knows that U.S. President Barack Obama hasn't got the guts to push the button. Not so with Russian President Vladimir Putin: After Crimea and the Donbass, unpredictability has become Putin's trademark style.

I must say that even Soviet propagandists never allowed themselves to speak so flippantly about the prospect of nuclear war…….


http://www.themoscowtimes.com/opinion/article/russia-s-nuclear-euphoria-ignores-reality/508499.html
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