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BeitragVerfasst am: Sa März 26, 2005 19:06:46 
Titel: F16 f?r Pakistan........
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http://www.vol.at/engine.aspx/page/vol-article-detail-page/cn/common-news-20050326-055700_000035/dc/tp:vol:news-nachrichtenTja, das musste ja kommen...............nicht das es mich st?ren w?rde!Net ist der Indische einwand, das die Viper's A-Waffenf?hig sind.....Wusste gar nicht, das Viper's und Hornet's in Indien in Frage kommen!?Hab ich das was verpasst???
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BeitragVerfasst am: Di März 29, 2005 13:52:55 
Titel: Re: F16 f?r Pakistan... is ne "Hype" !
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Hinti hat folgendes geschrieben:
Wusste gar nicht, das Viper's und Hornet's in Indien in Frage kommen!? Hab ich das was verpasst???
Naja verpasst, wie mans nimmt. Die Inder haben ihren RFI auch an Lockheed geschickt - und die Rice hat's in Indien gepusht (Viper nicht Hornet). Viele meinen aber, dass mit dem nunmehrigen O.K. an Pakistan indische F-16 wieder vom Tisch sind - sollte wohl eher ein Stabilisierungssignal f?r S?dasien sein. Au?erdem wollen die Inder "tactical nuke" f?r die 126 Maschinen - das kriegen's vom US-Congress eh net.... Hab bissl was gesammelt:Nette ? aber vordergr?ndige - CNN-Diskussion wegen der (endlich mal) fixierten F-16s f?r Pakistan...LOU DOBBS MONEYLINE CNN TV6:00 PM MARCH 25, 2005Pakistan to Receive F-16sDOBBS: There was a notable success for the defense industry today. The United States agreeing to sell F-16 fighter jets to Pakistan. The United States also offering to sell F-16s now to India. Pentagon correspondentBarbara Starr reports.BARBARA STARR: President Bush's decision to sell two dozen F-16s to Pakistan is part of the strategy to reward Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf for his help with the war on terrorism, U.S. officials say. The F-16s will help Pakistan with one of its immediate military goals: modernizing its fighter fleet.In 1990, Congress blocked the sale of F-16s to Islamabad because of Pakistan's nuclear program. Now, despite U.S. concern about Pakistani nuclear scientist A.Q. Khan, the Bush administration will tell Congress the sale will not destabilize the subcontinent.ADAM ERELI [State Department Spokesman]: Relations between India and Pakistan have never been better. That's point one. Point two, stability comes from a sense of security. And to the extent that we can contribute to Pakistan's sense of security and India's sense of security, that will contribute to regional stability.STARR: But Congress still has the final say.JOEL JOHNSON [Aerospace Industries Association]: I think they will certainly have some hearings, want some convincing.STARR: Archrival India wants to buy 125 new fighters itself and may disagree. The U.S. is now watching closely to see if India selects the F-16s or turns to Russia, France or Sweden, which have all expressed an interest in that $10 billion deal. The proposed $1.5 billion Pakistani sale will have a huge economic benefit in President Bush's home state of Texas. It will help keep Lockheed Martin's Ft. Worth production line up beyond this October, when it will begin shutting down if there are no new orders. In the last five months, the U.S. has also sold Pakistan's military new surveillance aircraft, anti-bunker weapons and modern communications gear, all that can be used in remote border areas.And Lou, Pentagon officials say that the Bush administration's decision is indeed all about Pakistan's security in the war on terrorism, in the battle again terrorists and the hunt for Osama bin Laden.Lou?DOBBS: Let's talk about the India side of this deal, Barbara, very quickly. As I understand it, 12 of the aircraft would be built in this country. In point of fact, in Ft. Worth, Texas. But then the remainder of that contract would be built in India, with the exception of the avionics and structural components necessary for those avionics.In other words, we would be outsourcing and off-shoring the F-16 to India.STARR: Well, India has, indeed, not yet made a selection. Russia, Sweden and France are also ?DOBBS: Right.STARR: Competing for that sale. But if they do, it's not unusual these days for U.S. military contractors specifically to try and offer some production deal to the foreign country that may be buying. It sweetens the pot. They hope that it sweetens the pot enough that they are selected for the deal and that they don't risk too much U.S. jobs. So if the F-16 is selected by India, it wouldn't be surprising, but it will all, of course, be subject to review by the Bush administration and approval by Congress.Lou?DOBBS: Review and, in point of fact, those offsets we're hearing precious little from the U.S. Congress on what would be an outright transfer of technology no matter how it's sliced. Barbara Starr, as always, thank you very much, reporting from the Pentagon.Wunderbarer Kommentar dazu ? er hat?s erkannt. In Zeiten wo schon Block 60 ausgeliefert werden, kommt?s auf 24 Block 52er wirklich nicht an ? speziell in einer Ecke wo sich die Sukhois und Mirages-2000 stapeln. ?Glaubt weiter an den Osterhasen?...: "We're all bunnies with these F-16s"Commentators who don't know any better are inclined to see decisions such as this F-16 sale in romantic terms, as part of a great struggle for freedom and democracy. As if 24 F-16s would mean that much. Especially for India where hundreds of better aircrafts are piled up ? and even older, refurbished ones had deadly surprised even the mighty USAF in exercises in 2004. In fact, such decisions are solely driven by competition for security and resources in a dangerous, fast-changing world. Nowadays, they are also routinely accompanied by cynical deceit on the part of governments and the wishful thinking of uncritical analysts. This gap between reality and self-serving, self-underlining rhetoric endangers the same very freedoms it purports to defend. The planes themselves do not mean much. Unless, that is, you believe in the Easter Bunny?Christopher Kremmer is a Herald contributor and author of The Carpet Wars: A Journey Across the Islamic Heartlands.Und das ist von dem ehem. US-Senator Larry Pressler, nach dessen Gesetzesvorlage damals das US-Waffenembargo gegen Pakistan und Indien entstanden ist (F-16 Pakistan vorenthalten = fliegen heute als US-Agressors). Es erkl?rt auch warum es politisch keine indischen F-16 geben wird...: Copyright 2005 HT Media Ltd.Indo-Asian News ServiceMarch 27, 2005To dance with the devil ?The Bush administration's decision to sell F-16 jets to Pakistan amounts to "rejecting India at the altar" of a new relationship and was "strategically a bad move", former Senator Larry Pressler has said. "Yesterday (March 25 when President George W. Bush called Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to convey the F-16 decision) was a sad day, the day we lost India," Pressler told IANS in an interview. "Yesterday (March 25 when President George W. Bush called Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to convey the F-16 decision) was a sad day, the day we lost India," Pressler told IANS in an interview. "I don't think India can accept that."Pressler further said: "The concept of rewarding a country for what any country should do is wrong. "Pakistan has been rewarded enough. And in any case what have F-16s got to do with fighting terror? I am not saying this because I want a good press in India but I think we are dancing with the devil?"
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BeitragVerfasst am: Di März 29, 2005 14:21:40 
Titel:
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Cool, danke f?r die ersch?pfende Erkl?rung.........Sind in dem Fall die USN-Agressoren.......nun ich bezweifle das die DIE wieder ahben wollen......wahren eh schon gegroundet smile smile :-)Heisst das jetzt 24 Block 52 aus USAF-Best?nden??Oder neue vom Band? Block 60??
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BeitragVerfasst am: Mi März 30, 2005 08:36:08 
Titel: Soweit ich das verstanden habe,...
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bedeutet das:24 F-16 C/D Block 52 genauso wie die 10 Maschinen f?r Chile!Letztere sind auch neu, und werden erst gebaut (oder sind gerade in Bau).Derzeit laufen Block 52er und die 60er vom selben Band.Erst letzte Woche wurde die LETZTE F-16C Block 52 an die USAF ausgeliefert! Auch die griechischen Maschinen sind Block 52+ und die F-16I sind auch irgendwo in der Leistungsklasse.Als Auslieferungspilot f?r die USAF hat sich ?brigens irgendein General bet?tigt, der damals an der Vertragserrichtung beteiligt war.
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BeitragVerfasst am: Mi März 30, 2005 09:17:43 
Titel: Re: Soweit ich das verstanden habe,...
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...gibts in den USA dar?ber laufend h?rbare R?lpser. Auch weil jetzt (doch) F/A-18 f?r Indien ins Spiel kommen....:Wall Street JournalMarch 29, 2005Pg. 14US Warplanes For South Asia !The Bush Administration's decision to sell F-16s to Pakistan is being criticized in some circles, though notably in the U.S., rather than in India as you might expect. New Delhi has raised some objections but it may consider a more sophisticated U.S. jet fighter 'mentioned' by the Bush-administration, the F-18, and is ready for an expanded strategic relationship.Chief among the U.S. alarmists has been Larry Pressler, who is calling the F-16 decision nothing less than an "atrocity." The former GOP Senator from South Dakota says the "military-industrial complex, which I believe dominates our foreign policy, favors Pakistan not only because we can sell it arms, but also because the Pentagon would often rather deal with dictatorships than democracies." They must be smiling about that one at the Bush Pentagon, which is usually heared these days for trying to topple dictatorships. Local arms-race - who cares ?The F-16/52 for sure is a valuable asset in Islamabad's war on terrorists hiding in the rugged terrain near Afghanistan. The argument that Pakistan wants the F-16 to deliver nuclear weapons to India, ignores the fact it can already do that in other ways - if it wishes to commit suicide...Und die Indian Times ?berschl?gt sich schon...:US offers co-production of F-18s to IndiaANI[ FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 2005 09:51:06 PM ]NEW DELHI: In a dramatic decision, the United States on Friday night offered the co-production of F-18 fighter jets to India. By allowing the F-18s to be sold to India, the US is making more than a simple statement of sale. Boeing's F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, popularly known as F-18s, and land and carrier-based fighter jets have not been sold to any country, even to NATO allies, according to senior aviation officials. As the details of the US deal for India unfold, it is clear that the F-16s for Pakistan are no match for what India partly already has and what it could access from the US. Defence Minister, Pranab Mukherjee said that this was the first time USA had come out with such a proposal, and that it called for serious consideration. However, he added that any decision will depend only on India's need for such aircraft, and not to enter an arms race. His statement came a day after the US announced the sale of F-16 jet fighters to Pakistan and signaled that India could move ahead with its own weapon buys.
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BeitragVerfasst am: Mi März 30, 2005 13:54:15 
Titel: Na, w?rde doch Sinn machen...
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Dann stehen vielleicht bald neben den MIG-29K mit rot-gr?nen Roundels dann F/A-18E/F mit den gleichen Kokarden. BOAAA!!! Da ist ein Tsunami harmlos gegen den Rock?n Roll, der sich dann im indischen Ozean abspielt! Und Diego Garcia in der Mitte!Schicke Hornets f?r schicke Inder?
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BeitragVerfasst am: Mi März 30, 2005 14:39:14 
Titel: Re: Na, w?rde doch Sinn machen...
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CHH hat folgendes geschrieben:
BOAAA!!! Da ist ein Tsunami harmlos gegen den Rock?n Roll, der sich dann im indischen Ozean abspielt! Und Diego Garcia in der Mitte!
...Jooho, und erst wenn die pakistanischen 16er auf 70 Stk. klettern sollten... :Pakistan likely to get 70 F-16s HiPakistanNews.com; ISLAMABAD, March 27:The Pakistan Air Force is likely to purchase about 70 F-16s of the latest Block 50/52 C and D type models costing about $2.4 to 2.8 billion, official sources said.Though the officials did not disclose the exact number of F-16s, each costing $35-40 million, being planned to be purchased, unofficial estimates based on previous fleet requirements of the PAF put the figure close to 70 planes."No number can be given at this stage. It will be decided in due course of time," said a senior official while quoting Air Chief Kaleem Saadat. When asked about media reports that Pakistan was looking forward to delivery of some two dozen F-16s, an official said: "Requirement is more than that."According to the officials, exact timeframe for the delivery could not be given at present as negotiations for the modalities were to be worked out. The teams from Lockheed Martin, the manufacturers of the F-16s, would visit Pakistan and reciprocal visits would be made by the top officials to US to work out modalities and finer details of the deal. Pakistan would have to raise the money required for the purchase of the latest F-16s, the official said.Part of the total cost is likely to be met from the five- year, $3 billion US assistance for Pakistan committed by Washington in 2003, half of which is for military purchases. The final delivery process could take a minimum of two years after the made-to-demand manufacturing process starts.Pakistan is looking forward to F-16 Block 50/52 C and D type with a capability to carry nuclear weapons, *including single seaters and dual seaters, advanced avionics and weapons upgrades. In short, the latest version, an official said.According to the US media, Washington's decision to sell F-16s had come just in time for Lockheed Martin which was contemplating taking action to close the production line that employs about 5,000 workers, in case new orders for the jet did not come by this fall.During the 1980s, the PAF received 40 F-16s under the deal named as "Peace Gate (PG)". Deliveries under Peace Gate-I included six F-16s comprising two F-16As (Serial No. 82701-02) and four F-16Bs (Serial No. 82601-04) and follow-up support of $156 million.Deliveries under Peace Gate-II included 34 F-16's of both F-16A and F-16B models and a follow-up support of $1 billion. The F-16s which never made to Pakistan included some 71 negotiated as part of PG-III and PG-IV deals.Of the total 71 under the negotiated PG-III and PG-IV, the first ten under the PG-IV were delivered while the delivery of other 60 F-16s was stopped by the US during the 1990s after Pakistan had paid for them. Moreover, Pakistan had to pay for the storage of the falcon birds at the US Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Centre.The sources said that the PAF initiated the programme for upgrading the F-16s at Aeronautical Complex Kamra after the US refused to supply the spares in the wake of Pressler Amendment and the post nuclear sanctions of 1998.When asked if the funds already paid up for the F-16s would be used for the new deal, an official said that the previous payment was a separate issue and would be dealt separately.If delivered after a minimum period of two years, the F-16 Block50/52 models would be an addition in the nuclear capable aircraft fleet of PAF which was already looking forward to delivery of Super 7 aircraft, a joint Pakistan-China venture.*Also doch trotz tactical-nuke-Expexctations ? Zuerst jahrelanges Pressler-Embargo und dann wieder volle W?sch' ? Was hat Musharrafs Wohlverhalten-Spagat im "War on Terror" mit den Nuklearpotentialen beider Staaten zu tun, auch die Inder haben dezidiert tactical-nuke in ihrer n?chsten Ausschreibung stehen..."To dance with the devil", sagte derselbe Sen. Pressler dieser Tage...
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BeitragVerfasst am: Do März 31, 2005 06:55:36 
Titel: Re: Soweit ich das verstanden habe,...
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...d?rfen wir mitbieten, sagt man bei Boeing in St. Louis (Jubell !). Ob aber die Super-Hornet f?r die von Indien gesuchte "Light Multi-Role"-Nische zwischen LCA und Su-30MKI nicht etwas zu ?ppig ist, bei immerhin 126 Stk. ??:St. Louis Post-DispatchMarch 29, 2005Boeing Could Bid On Indian Fighter JetsIf Super Hornet is sought, St. Louis would benefitBy Tim McLaughlin, Of the Post-DispatchBoeing Co. could get a chance to sell its St. Louis-built F/A-18 Super Hornet to India after the administration of President George W. Bush reversed a 15-year ban and agreed to supply F-16 fighter jets to neighboring Pakistan. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice recently said U.S. defense companies will be allowed to bid on India's expected request for information (RFI) on advanced fighter jets."If the F/A-18 is one of those airplanes, Boeing is pleased that the U.S. would allow us to compete," Boeing spokesman Tom Young said Monday. "But until we understand what those requirements are, it's premature to speculate on that."With minor exceptions, India has been locked out of the market for U.S. arms, mostly relying on Soviet Union-era MiG fighters. Up to 5,000 Boeing employees in St. Louis work on the Super Hornet program. The unit cost for the plane is about $50 million. The only current customer -- and a good one -- is the U.S. Navy. In late 2003, the Navy awarded a $9.6 billion contract to Boeing for production of an additional 210 Super Hornets, including development of a version of the plane to jam and destroy enemy radar.Boeing is in discussions to sell the fighter to a few other countries, but those prospects can't be disclosed, Young said. Critics say any sale of advanced fighters to Pakistan or India could inflame tensions between two countries with nuclear capabilities and a history of war.In the past, the U.S. government has barred sales of advanced weapons to both countries."The biggest problem of selling F-16s to Pakistan is that they can be used as delivery vehicles for nuclear weapons," said William Hartung, director of the World Policy Institute's Arms Trade Resource Center. "Both sides are still at loggerheads over Kashmir. Weapons sales could be a significant factor in increasing tensions between the two countries."Many see sales of Lockheed Martin Corp.'s F-16 Falcon to Pakistan as Washington's reward to Islamabad for its support of the Bush administration's war on terror. In turn, sales of American-made jets to India makes the Pakistan deal go down easier in New Delhi, Hartung said."If the U.S. becomes a major supplier to India, that could raise alarms with China," he added.In a meeting with The Washington Post's editorial board on Friday, Rice played down the idea that tensions would be escalated by fighter jet deals."What we're trying to do is to solidify and extend relations with both India and Pakistan at a time when we have good relations with both of them, something that most people didn't think could be done, and when they have improving relationships with one another," Rice said.Her office provided a transcript of the question-and-answer session on the secretary of state's Web site*. Rice said she spoke with India's leaders about broadening and deepening the relationship with the United States through defense and energy cooperation. The United States also wants to demonstrate to India that it would be a reliable defense supplier, if India chooses to do that, Rice said.*http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2005/43863.htm"We are going to respond to their request for information . . .yes, for high-performance aircraft," Rice said. "And by responding to the request for information, we intend to let our companies bid."Rice said the United States is trying to disrupt the notion "that anything that happens good for Pakistan has to be bad for India, and vice versa."
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BeitragVerfasst am: Do März 31, 2005 10:36:15 
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Bei aller Liebe zur Fliegerei und den Dingen um die es in diesem Forum geht, aber findet ihr das nicht pervers?Zu fressen haben sie nix, aber einen Haufen Geld f?r Kampfflugzeuge!Fallt jetzt nicht ?ber mich her, das sind halt so Sachen, die schiessen mir da durch den Kopf. :think:
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BeitragVerfasst am: Fr Apr 01, 2005 07:04:06 
Titel: Perversionen...
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Thomsen hat folgendes geschrieben:
Bei aller Liebe zur Fliegerei und den Dingen um die es in diesem Forum geht, aber findet ihr das nicht pervers? Zu fressen haben sie nix, aber einen Haufen Geld f?r Kampfflugzeuge!
...hatte ich mir auch schon gedacht. Speziell aber eher bei afrikanischen L?ndern, bestes Beispiel waren 2000 und 2001 ?thiopien und Eritrea. Mittlerweile haben sie ja beide Flanker (!). Aber nur weil sie sich etwa Mirages-2000 nicht leisten k?nnen, nicht weil sie ihnen die Franzosen nicht etwa vorenthalten w?rden. Obwohl das eigentlich der Kern Deiner Bemerkung ist. W?rden die Hersteller-L?ndern solchen armen Schluckern sagen, "wissts was, nehmt das Geld und baut Brunnen und Spit?ler und kommt in 10 Jahren wieder...!" Aber das ist (irgendwo leider) in der Realit?t Gutmenschen-Denken. Auch weil OHNE die Flugzeuge NIEMAND in diesen L?ndern auch nur EINE lokale W?hrungseinheit MEHR im Tascherl h?tte. Genauso wie die Opposition bei uns den KRONE-Gehirngewaschenen suggeriert, die 18 Eurofighter w?rden uns alle finanziell umbringen...! Auch das ist pervers. Wirklich pervers ist aber, dass die Amerikaner wissen m?ssen dass die Pakistanis die F-16 "nuke-wired" gemacht haben oder (die Neuen) machen werden. Soviel zu dem "non-proliferation"-Gequatsche. Ich war ja paar Tage in Ft. Worth und die waren alle wirklich sehr nett und impressiv - aber DAS sind auch deren Arbeitspl?tze NICHT wert...!Dazu Fred Kaplan im "Slate Magazine" vom March 31, 2005The Wings of a Hawkhttp://slate.msn.com/id/2115965/Zitat:With his decision last week to sell F-16 fighter planes to Pakistan, President Bush returns to a dangerous game of self-deception that hasn't been seen at this level of risk since Richard Nixon was in the White House. The deal involves a mere couple of dozen F-16s, but it opens up three avenues of great hazard....Second, Bush (pending near-certain congressional approval) is lifting a ban on arms transfers to Pakistan that has been in effect since 1989. The restriction was imposed after intelligence clearly revealed that Pakistan was turning its stockpile of enriched uranium into nuclear bombs. The U.S. Foreign Assistance Act forbade the supply of any weapons to countries that crossed this line. So, President George H.W. Bush issued a stop order, halting production of 43 F-16s earmarked for Pakistan (in addition to 40 already delivered), 17 of them paid for in advance. It is this transaction that Bush's son now seeks to resume "even though Pakistan has not only pushed ahead with nuclear weapons but sold the resulting technology to several tinhorn dictators.Worse still, the latest version of the plane, the F-16C/D-52 "which is the model Pakistan will receive "can carry atomic bombs under its wings. The plane's wiring would have to be modified in order for the bombs to be fused and dropped, but German intelligence agencies reported long ago that the Pakistanis have figured out how to do this. President Bush and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice have said Pakistan needs the F-16s to combat terrorists in the mountains on the Afghan border. But really - on equal expectations - it wants them to drop bombs on India in case of another India-Pakistan war. (Pakistan already has two types of missiles that can do this; India has nuclear-capable planes and missiles, as well.)What's really happening is that the question, Why should we sell arms to a particular country? has been replaced by, Why not? In the case of Pakistan, there's the further consideration that India is determined to buy 125 new fighter jets to replace its fleet of antiquated Soviet-built MiGs; it's looking at the F-16, but also at French-built Mirages. That being the case, selling F-16s to Pakistan can be rationalized as a step to preserve the balance of power. Besides, if Musharraf doesn't buy the planes from us, he can look to the French or the Chinese.In other words, for all the talking about rewarding friends and maintaining influence, what this really comes down to "what it's always come down to "is money and market share. During the Cold War, the market share was political (if we don't sell planes to Peru, the Russians will); now it's economic (if we don't sell planes to Pakistan, the Chinese will).The decision will raise new doubts about President Bush's declared desire to halt the spread of nuclear weapons "and his still more prominent declaration to judge regimes on the basis of their dedication to freedom. Selling Pakistan nuclear-capable fighter jets is an act at odds with both. By potentially setting in motion a new arms race in southern Asia, it also seems at odds with more traditional notions involving the balance of power.Fred Kaplan writes the "War Stories" column for Slate as well as occasional pieces on music and consumer electronics. He is the author of The Wizards of Armageddon and a former staff reporter for the Boston Globe, having been its military correspondent, Moscow bureau chief, and New York bureau chief. A long time ago, he was the foreign and defense policy adviser to Rep. Les Aspin. He graduated from Oberlin College and has a Ph.D. in political science from MIT. He lives in Brooklyn.
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BeitragVerfasst am: Sa Apr 02, 2005 07:34:36 
Titel: Re: Pakistanische (US ?)-Perversionen II
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Thomsen hat folgendes geschrieben:
Bei aller Liebe zur Fliegerei und den Dingen um die es in diesem Forum geht, aber findet ihr das nicht pervers? Zu fressen haben sie nix, aber einen Haufen Geld f?r Kampfflugzeuge!
Noch eins drauf - noch pointierter. "Gratis raus aus dem Gef?ngnis-K?rtchen" f?r Pakistan...!:Baltimore SunApril 1, 2005The Cost Of Rewarding PakistanIF PAKISTAN were playing Monopoly, it would seem to have its very own stack of "Get out of jail free" cards - all handed out by Washington.Fifteen years ago, the United States blocked the sale of F-16 fighter jets to Islamabad because it had developed nuclear weapons. Last week - in the latest of Washington's post-9/11 moves to ensure at least limited loyalty from Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf - the United States said it would allow the sale of these jets. To placate Pakistan's historic rival, the Bush administration then offered India a much fuller strategic relationship and even more-advanced Hornet-jets.Almost incredibly, this follows revelations that put the father of the Islamic bomb, Pakistani hero A. Q. Khan, at the center of an international network that had been spreading nuclear technology and hardware to Iran, Libya and North Korea for years. Mr. Khan already has been pardoned by General Musharraf, who continues to display the true nature of his friendship with Washington by not allowing U.S. investigators to interview the scientist.The F-16 sale sends a terrible message about the very high U.S. tolerance of even nuclear misdeeds by its chosen strongmen. (You'd think that at the very least General Musharraf would let the Bush administration's proliferation fighters learn what Mr. Khan knows.)The U.S. war on terror should be - for now - on Pakistan's western front, not along its border with India. But will F-16s do anything to prevent jihadists from coming to power there? It does nothing to address the high poverty and low education rates fueling that rise.But it's still a very dangerous move. These sales reinvigorate an arms race along one of the world's most volatile borders at a time of improving relations. Both sides already can drop nuclear bombs on each other, but these jets are for war - not helping Islamabad locate Osama bin Laden's bunker.Full Story: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/bal-ed.pakistan01apr01,1,7486271.story
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Georg MADER -- Korrespondent von Jane's Defence Weekly / MILITARY-TECHNOLOGY
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Anmeldungsdatum: 07.08.2004
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BeitragVerfasst am: Sa Apr 02, 2005 08:05:36 
Titel: @Georg et al - from the policy front..
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Verstehe Euer Unbehagen sehr gut, und, bin auch diesem speziellen Fall im Zweifel eher dagegen.Bitte aber doch auch die Fortschritte im Verh?ltnis Indien / Pakistan nicht aus den Augen zu verlieren.Es hat sehr grosse und ermutigende Fortschritte gegeben.Hier eine etwas differenziertere Sicht der Dinge, von Tom Donnelly im "weeklystandard", die sich eher auf das seit l?ngerer Zeit positive Klima zwischen den USA und Indien bezieht.http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/005/420lqluy.asp?pg=1
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